Join innovative leaders from the worlds of arts and culture, government, community and economic development and grantmaking at the 2021 Appalachian Creative Placemaking Leadership Summit. Engage with others who are enhancing places through creativity and art through training sessions, field workshops and conversations that will generate next steps for the new decade. Past participants have formed new collaborations, gained vital insights and have inspired each other towards excellence in equitable practice.

Sessions

PLenary

Did My Taxes Pay for That?!? - THURSDAY


Caitlin Cameron City of Portland, Maine We’ve all heard someone in our community say, “How much did the city pay for that artwork?!” Public art often gets short shrift with competition for limited resources, making it seem difficult to accommodate the creation and maintenance of public art and creative placemaking efforts. Partnerships are a reliable, though sometimes challenging, way to initiate, implement, and finance quality creative placemaking projects. The Urban Designer and Public Administrator from Portland, Maine, shares how to cultivate partnership-based art projects to achieve community goals in creative, cost-effective ways and how to access funding.




Connecting Dots: The Artist Continuum in the Creative Economy - THURSDAY


Jessica Stern Americans for the Arts Ami Scherson Americans for the Arts Participants will get a better understanding of a broad definition of the creativity economy and how to map it in their community. They'll also learn how different entities intersect and how to leverage resources in their communities to build an inclusive creative economy. The session will explore how people from various backgrounds can navigate structures and pursue alternative business models.




Win Stakeholders by Proving Impact - THURSDAY


Carolyn Edlund, Daniel DiGriz The Clark Hulings Fund for Visual Artists Placemakers must be able to measure impact in order to prove the efficacy of a program, increase credibility, gain support, and attract collaborators. Data science measures change and collates results. It opens new possibilities, but only if you know what and how to measure, and design programs to be able to extract what you need at the end. In this interactive session, instructors will look at how outcomes are reached and can be presented to maximize stakeholder participation. Then, they'll roll up their sleeves and work together, giving participants the ability to start using these powerful data tools.




Structuring Successful Municipal/Artist Partnerships - THURSDAY


Barbara Schaffer Bacon, Nadia Malik Animating Democracy at Americans for the Arts, Mural Arts Philadelphia Municipal/Artist (M/A) partnerships are collaborations between local governments and artists that use creative processes to engage diverse residents and improve communities. To support growing interest in these collaborations we will share a practical resource created to guide municipal agency leaders, artists, and arts agency leaders to achieve positive and powerful artistic and civic results. The guide gives focus to the risks, responsibilities, and rewards that arise when artists and municipalities work together. It helps users visualize a spectrum of partnership models to demonstrate the diversity of this work, and to develop a unique model for their municipality.




The Story: From a Monument to a Civic Public Space - FRIDAY


Misa Chen WRT Eszter Kutas Philadelphia Holocaust Remembrance Foundation (PHRF) In this session, a landscape architect who led the multi-disciplinary design team, and the executive director for a non-profit organization will discuss the process of transforming a quarter acre of underutilized urban commemorative space around Polish artist Nathan Rapoport’s 1964 Monument - America’s oldest public Holocaust memorial – into an inclusive outdoor classroom. Learn the challenges associated with designing an accessible and inclusive public plaza in an urban context while still providing a high-quality public realm experience; Hear how a commemorative space coexists with day-to-day activities and brings diverse people together to celebrate; Gain insight into the capital funding & long-term sustainability.




Creative Placemaking for Equity and Inclusion - FRIDAY


Annis Sengupta, Carolina Prieto Metropolitan Area Planning Council Creative placemaking is an opportunity to reshape municipal power dynamics. It draws on the knowledge, creativity, and capacity of artists and cultural organizations and brings them into municipal decision-making processes as leaders. In this session, interactive activities will feature tools to address power dynamics that emerge in these municipal processes and to create space for building authentic partnerships that advance equity and inclusion. Case studies will highlight how creative placemaking practice that centers diversity, equity and inclusion can build and maintain trust, transparency and accountability, and they will illuminate strategies to mitigate gentrification and displacement drawn from MAPC’s work.




Art, Equity in Design, and Community Capacity Building - THURSDAY


Shari Hersh Mural Arts Philadelphia Gamar Markarian Independent Artist Sulay Sosa Independent Artist Restored Spaces Initiative’s work creates an equitable space for individuals and groups to shape positive change in their communities. Through game play, imaginative tactics, and co-design and fabrication, what evolves is long-term community ownership, stewardship, and use of a public space. The team will share the art and design methodologies used in the Southwark School project and will invite the audience to participate in innovative game-playing.




Promising Practices in Participatory Artmaking - FRIDAY


Susannah Laramee Kidd Independent Consultant Through 2019 Metris Arts Consulting's Susannah Laramee Kid worked with Mural Arts Philadelphia on a research assignment asking the questions: What are the promising practices embedded in exemplary Mural Arts projects that Mural Arts should emphasize in its continuing work and should share with others? What are the promising approaches to creating artwork with communities? Through this session, Susannah and Mural Arts staff and Artists will share and explore highlights of this work while also facilitating self-reflection and group thinking around the work of participants with the guiding questions: What are examples of these practices in your own projects/programs? How can some of these practices be better applied to your work? What might the challenges be?





Description: Moments to come together as a full Summit group and learn from leaders in the field. Focuses on storytelling, case studies, and panel discussion.

Core

Competencies and Ethics in Creative Placemaking - FRIDAY


Leonardo Vazquez, AICP/PP The National Consortium for Creative Placemaking Margy Waller Topos Partnership What should creative placemakers know? What should they believe? How should they practice their craft? This session will provide some answers, based on crowdsourced information from creative placemakers around the United States. The National Consortium for Creative Placemaking explored these three questions with participants at 10 Creative Placemaking Leadership Summits around the United States in 2018 and 2019. Since 2012, NCCP has engaged hundreds of professionals in this field about their practice. We will report on our findings and offer recommendations for evaluating creative placemaking practitioners and developing an ethical code for the field. This session will be particularly useful to grantmakers, leaders and educators in creative placemaking.




Creative Financing for Creative Placemaking - FRIDAY


Joe Palazzolo New Jersey Community Capital This session is for creative community builders who have gone through the process of bringing an idea to life, but are unsure how to scale the idea, unsure how to engage in conversations with financing entities, are unclear about how financing works in the creative space, or are considering how to make their idea financially sustainable. The focus will be on proven methods of obtaining financing for creative projects, how and when to view creative projects as small business ventures, and what long-term financial sustainability looks like for creative placemaking.





Description: Series of Creative Placemaking Core workshops/presentations that emphasize the basics of creative placemaking. These provide a track throughout the Summit to introduce, remind, or sharpen skills.

Peer exchanges and Strategic Conversations

"Setting The Stage for Success"

Setting the Stage for Success - THURSDAY


Explore and discuss better ways to plan for successful creative placemaking and learn from mistakes. Learn from three cases in Philadelphia and Allentown, PA. The featured presentations are as follows: Emma Fried-Cassorla Delaware River Waterfront Corp As waterfront development momentum continues to build and revitalization efforts move forward, DRWC identified new and greater opportunities for art and culture along the waterfront. With that came a need for a more intentional process for incorporating both the art itself and the artistic communities in the development of public spaces. A three-year long process added a “cultural layer” to the Master Plan for the Central Delaware, resulting in a clearly defined vision for locating art outside of traditional venues and expanding cultural experiences. Sean King Cultural Coalition of Allentown Over the past five years, CCA has attempted to introduce the concepts of creative placemaking and the creative economy to the business, government and artistic leaders of the region, sometimes to mixed results. The “Failing Forward Fast” session will take attendees through the highs and lows of educating a community on the elements of the creative economy and how to navigate the pitfalls which inevitably arise when building a sustainable implementation strategy. Session participants will learn tips and techniques from the real world successes and failures they may encounter in building a community-wide creative economy program. Dan Gasiewski City of Philadelphia Explore work in neighborhoods to transform existing city assets into hubs of creativity and culture. Dan will highlight methodology for creating and sustaining community involvement by using existing spaces in new ways, while simultaneously creating economic opportunities for artists to expand their audiences and work with their own communities. He will share the impact of these programs on the spaces, their communities, and the local artists. Participants will learn about a program that leverages existing infrastructure for creative placemaking that may serve as a model in their communities. Sharla Russell City of Philadelphia The public realm comprises the streets, sidewalks, public plazas, parks and other outdoor spaces that are available without charge and require no key to access them. The public realm belongs to everyone. But in Philadelphia, crumbling sidewalks, rapid and disruptive real estate development, and perceptions of safety create barriers for residents, women and children, seniors, and persons with disabilities. How can placemaking be a tool for: improving premier urban elements such as streets and sidewalks that connect and unify public and private places; creating a sense of place and community; and ensuring access to public spaces that are safe, inclusive and inviting?




Growing and Sustaining Creative Placemaking - THURSDAY


Explore and discuss strategies being used in Maine, New Jersey and Pennsylvania to create healthier and more resilient environments for creative placemaking. These include alternative tax structures, programs that build prestige, advancing cultural entrepreneurship, and incorporating art into infrastructure planning. The featured presentations are: - Growing and sustaining creative placemaking: Innovative approaches
- Turn Infrastructure Projects into Creative Placemaking Projects
- Stronger Creatives = Stronger Places Featured Instructors are: Caitlin Cameron City of Portland, Maine Adam Kenney Bridgeway Capital - Craft Business Accelerator




Issues in State Agency Support of Creative Placemaking- FRIDAY


Research shows that most creative placemaking initiatives have local, grass-roots origins. But that landscape is shifting. Policies by state-level agencies can play important roles in advancing local action. This session will demonstrate the work of two state arts agencies in our region—the Maryland State Arts Council and the PA Council on the Arts. In a group conversation with attendees, panelists will specifically address how their agencies work with local entities AND other state agencies, examining successes, challenges, and benefits to placemakers and residents. How to improve working relationships will also be explored. Featured Instructors are: David B. Pankratz (moderator) The Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council Steven Skerritt-Davis Maryland Arts Coucil Sarah Merritt Pennsylvania Arts Council





"Growing and Sustaining Creative Placemaking"

Growing and sustaining creative placemaking: Innovative approaches - THURSDAY


New Jersey is home to a variety of initiatives that have inspired more creative placemaking: Sustainable Jersey Arts Actions offer prestige. Arts Tank is a 'Shark Tank' style competition. The local CDFI, New Jersey Community Capital, offers loans and lines of credit for creative placemaking. The Northern New Jersey Community Foundation has become a major catalyst and funder in the North Jersey suburbs. NCCP and NJEDA are working on an initiative to grow the state's cultural economy. Participants will learn about these initiatives and how organizations can work to create a web of initiatives to support creative placemaking.




Turn Infrastructure Projects into Creative Placemaking Projects - THURSDAY


Caitlin Cameron City of Portland, Maine Local governments have on-going infrastructure projects to accomplish the nuts and bolts of city and transportation functionality. While projects are being designed, approvals sought, and construction crews mobilized, why not incorporate public art and creative placemaking elements? The case profile will focus on three examples in Portland, Maine where infrastructure projects were enhanced, physically and financially, by incorporating creative placemaking.




Stronger Creatives = Stronger Places - THURSDAY


Adam Kenney Bridgeway Capital - Craft Business Accelerator I plan to outline the value of interweaving themes of entrepreneurship into creative placemaking efforts. Creative places are made more energetic and resilient when activated by capable and confident artists, designers, craftspeople, and makers. That empowerment is enhanced when they allocate energy towards developing sustainable businesses, as well as their creative practices. When their business status and financial health are sound, creative entrepreneurs more actively participate in the elements of creative placemaking. Their success also dispels stereotypes of “starving artists” which counters the goal of creative placemaking in presenting the arts as a source of cultural and economic vitality.





"Successful Strategies for More Inclusive Communities"

Building Vibrant Communities from Within - THURSDAY


Leigh Solomon Pugliano, Zaheen Hussain New Sun Rising New Sun Rising will share examples of convening community stakeholders, co-designing programs with communities, and planning for various stages of community interaction.




Re-forging the Cultural Legacy of the Lehigh Valley - THURSDAY


Keiko Tsuruta Cramer WRT Winner of the 2017 Rudy Bruner Award, one of the largest brownfield sites in the country is now showcased as part of a unique cultural and entertainment campus known as the SteelStacks, contributing to the extensive economic resurgence of the Lehigh Valley. With this catalytic project, the city and region continue to transform urban environment through placemaking, and all started from grassroots movement within the community. This session will share insight of creative process, how plcemaking can be a springboard for economic development, and Learn how underutilized cultural artifacts can be re-imagined as public spaces through placemaking design process.




Case Study: Front Line Care Givers Respond - THURSDAY


Helen Kauder Artspace Over the past two years, our annual festival has addressed themes related to healthcare, aging and well-being. This presentation will describe the ways we created a forum for the language, movement, and ideas of care, as practiced by end of life care givers (e.g. ER Room Trauma Nurse, Hospice worker, Cancer Buddy, Death Doula), became inspiration for artists to make dance, music, theater and visual work. We will also look at intergenerational collaborations that engage artists in their 70s, 80s, and 90s and pass memory on.





"Housing and Gentrification Issues in Creative Placemaking"

Intergenerational Homesharing: Community Cohered by Story - FRIDAY


Rachel Wenrick Writers Room, Drexel University In this short presentation, I’ll share how the method of co-creation, core to Writers Room since the program’s inception in 2014, has allowed us to develop the concept for a writers house and intergenerational homesharing network as an anti-displacement strategy, build the extensive cross-discipline, cross-sector partner network needed to implement it, and earn crucial neighborhood and institutional support. The goal is for participants to leave with ideas for how this concept might be adapted in their own communities.




Creative Placekeeping: Art Pop Lancaster, PA - FRIDAY


Salina Mayloni Almanzar Independent Artist (employed at F&M College and Drexel University) I plan to describe the process behind Art Pop as well as the collaboration between individuals, local organizations, the city Public Art Committee, and the city at large. The collaborative approach was crucial to the success, trust-building, and success of the project. I will present a slideshow of the work in the park, describe how each activity or pivot point was created and used to advance the project. Ultimately, I hope to engage the audience in a dialogue as an artist and community member dealing with the tension between the arts, rapid gentrification, and segregation in Lancaster City.





"Tools for Activating Underutilized Spaces"

Using Geolocative Tech to Increase Inclusivity - FRIDAY


Adrienne Mackey Swim Pony Performing Arts TrailOff will be a transmedial walking performance created by my company Swim Pony in collaboration with the Pennsylvania Environmental Council (PEC), premiering June 2020 as a free-to-download mobile app. Central to the project are 10 original audio stories, inspired by paths within the region’s expansive Circuit Trail network. Each trail will feature an original drama that unfolds over a roughly 2 mile route, written by a local author who demonstrates both rigorous artistic practice and connections to communities traditionally underserved by environmental programming. Audiences will experience these intimate journeys through the app, which uses GPS triggering to link audio to physical attributes along the mapped route. Once launched, the app will be maintained and available (always free of charge) for a year. This session looks at how to structure projects that use geolocative opportunities to embed stories and experience into place as well as some best tips at inviting communities into a tech-collaboration. It also explores some of the best practices that will need to be in place to create real room for artist and community empowerment while still meeting the deadlines and needs of the app development process.




A Toolkit for Early-Phase Infrastructure Reuse Projects - FRIDAY


Asima Jansveld Friends of the High Line, Inc. Aware of the potential of community transformation through public space, the High Line Network creates a learning community for infrastructure reuse projects and their leaders. Its Best Practices Toolkit: Strategies and Tactics for Early-Phase Infrastructure Reuse Projects provides a starter “how-to” guide for community leaders to create dynamic spaces while maximizing benefits to local communities. This session will share the toolkit’s lessons on how leaders can incorporate equitable policies from the onset of their planning work. While the session will focus on infrastructure reuse projects led by nonprofit partners in particular, all open space leaders are encouraged to attend.




What happens when you add 50 hammocks? - FRIDAY


Lizzie Woods Delaware River Waterfront Corp DRWC is the steward of Philadelphia’s central Delaware River waterfront. It is also the landholder of many piers, upland green spaces, and plazas. As the organization works to transform the waterfront into a recreational, cultural and commercial district, it does so through the reclamation and reuse of this existing infrastructure. Using hammocks, lights, and art, and of course its location on the river, DRWC has been able to transform an unused sculpture park, a 100 year-old municipal pier, and a high-rise plaza into national destinations.





Description: These "unplugged" discussions focus on the big pictures of the field. In particular, they aim at producing resolutions or next steps to make real impact following the Summit.

STRATEGIC CONVERSATION

These discussions are based on successful models / case studies in the field. Work is presented in a "TED Talk" style, with an interactive and discussion element following with participants.

Training Sessions

Did My Taxes Pay for That?!? - THURSDAY


Caitlin Cameron City of Portland, Maine We’ve all heard someone in our community say, “How much did the city pay for that artwork?!” Public art often gets short shrift with competition for limited resources, making it seem difficult to accommodate the creation and maintenance of public art and creative placemaking efforts. Partnerships are a reliable, though sometimes challenging, way to initiate, implement, and finance quality creative placemaking projects. The Urban Designer and Public Administrator from Portland, Maine, shares how to cultivate partnership-based art projects to achieve community goals in creative, cost-effective ways and how to access funding.




Connecting Dots: The Artist Continuum in the Creative Economy - THURSDAY


Jessica Stern Americans for the Arts Ami Scherson Americans for the Arts Participants will get a better understanding of a broad definition of the creativity economy and how to map it in their community. They'll also learn how different entities intersect and how to leverage resources in their communities to build an inclusive creative economy. The session will explore how people from various backgrounds can navigate structures and pursue alternative business models.




Win Stakeholders by Proving Impact - THURSDAY


Carolyn Edlund, Daniel DiGriz The Clark Hulings Fund for Visual Artists Placemakers must be able to measure impact in order to prove the efficacy of a program, increase credibility, gain support, and attract collaborators. Data science measures change and collates results. It opens new possibilities, but only if you know what and how to measure, and design programs to be able to extract what you need at the end. In this interactive session, instructors will look at how outcomes are reached and can be presented to maximize stakeholder participation. Then, they'll roll up their sleeves and work together, giving participants the ability to start using these powerful data tools.




Structuring Successful Municipal/Artist Partnerships - THURSDAY


Barbara Schaffer Bacon, Nadia Malik Animating Democracy at Americans for the Arts, Mural Arts Philadelphia Municipal/Artist (M/A) partnerships are collaborations between local governments and artists that use creative processes to engage diverse residents and improve communities. To support growing interest in these collaborations we will share a practical resource created to guide municipal agency leaders, artists, and arts agency leaders to achieve positive and powerful artistic and civic results. The guide gives focus to the risks, responsibilities, and rewards that arise when artists and municipalities work together. It helps users visualize a spectrum of partnership models to demonstrate the diversity of this work, and to develop a unique model for their municipality.




The Story: From a Monument to a Civic Public Space - FRIDAY


Misa Chen WRT Eszter Kutas Philadelphia Holocaust Remembrance Foundation (PHRF) In this session, a landscape architect who led the multi-disciplinary design team, and the executive director for a non-profit organization will discuss the process of transforming a quarter acre of underutilized urban commemorative space around Polish artist Nathan Rapoport’s 1964 Monument - America’s oldest public Holocaust memorial – into an inclusive outdoor classroom. Learn the challenges associated with designing an accessible and inclusive public plaza in an urban context while still providing a high-quality public realm experience; Hear how a commemorative space coexists with day-to-day activities and brings diverse people together to celebrate; Gain insight into the capital funding & long-term sustainability.




Creative Placemaking for Equity and Inclusion - FRIDAY


Annis Sengupta, Carolina Prieto Metropolitan Area Planning Council Creative placemaking is an opportunity to reshape municipal power dynamics. It draws on the knowledge, creativity, and capacity of artists and cultural organizations and brings them into municipal decision-making processes as leaders. In this session, interactive activities will feature tools to address power dynamics that emerge in these municipal processes and to create space for building authentic partnerships that advance equity and inclusion. Case studies will highlight how creative placemaking practice that centers diversity, equity and inclusion can build and maintain trust, transparency and accountability, and they will illuminate strategies to mitigate gentrification and displacement drawn from MAPC’s work.




Art, Equity in Design, and Community Capacity Building - THURSDAY


Shari Hersh Mural Arts Philadelphia Gamar Markarian Independent Artist Sulay Sosa Independent Artist Restored Spaces Initiative’s work creates an equitable space for individuals and groups to shape positive change in their communities. Through game play, imaginative tactics, and co-design and fabrication, what evolves is long-term community ownership, stewardship, and use of a public space. The team will share the art and design methodologies used in the Southwark School project and will invite the audience to participate in innovative game-playing.




Promising Practices in Participatory Artmaking - FRIDAY


Susannah Laramee Kidd Independent Consultant Through 2019 Metris Arts Consulting's Susannah Laramee Kid worked with Mural Arts Philadelphia on a research assignment asking the questions: What are the promising practices embedded in exemplary Mural Arts projects that Mural Arts should emphasize in its continuing work and should share with others? What are the promising approaches to creating artwork with communities? Through this session, Susannah and Mural Arts staff and Artists will share and explore highlights of this work while also facilitating self-reflection and group thinking around the work of participants with the guiding questions: What are examples of these practices in your own projects/programs? How can some of these practices be better applied to your work? What might the challenges be?





Hands on session, focused on learning tools and techniques to be applied to communities outside of Summit. More emphasis on participation and takeaways. 

Field Workshops

Chester, PA: Leadership and renewal through the arts - FRIDAY


Ulysses Slaughter Chester Made / Pennsylvania Humanities Council, Devon Walls MJ Freed Theater; Artist Warehouse Inc. This experiential Field Workshop will start at the iconic Brothers Restaurant, where participants will enjoy locally made specialties, learn about the Chester Made Institute, and participate in a conversation about asset-based leadership with Pennsylvania Humanities Council and Chester artists, residents, and other leaders. Participants will then walk through Chester, visiting local artists and business owners with a final stop at the Chester Made Makerspace where everyone will roll up their sleeves and contribute to a collaborative art piece.




Color Me Back: A Same Day Work and Pay Program - FRIDAY


Nadia Malik, Alvin Tull, Emily Crane Mural Arts Philadelphia Mural Arts Philadelphia leader Nadia Malik will present on using participatory public art to advance individual and community health outcomes. Participants will be required to travel to the Color Me Back studio at Suburban Station to participate in this session. They will begin by learning from Porch Light program Director Nadia Malik, about MAP’s Porch Light program goals and the different models that Mural Arts employs in working with adults struggling with housing insecurity, mental illness, trauma, and/or chemical dependency. Then they will focus learning about the innovative new program, Color Me Back: A Same Day Work and Pay Program and engage in hands-on activities such as mural painting led by the artists who work in this unique space. Conversation, curiosity, and questions are encouraged in this opportunity to learn about what works, what we have discovered along the way, and what folks should be mindful of in creating similar programs.




Creative Placemaking On the Go - FRIDAY


Jerry Puryear, Cass Green Mill Creek Community Partnership Participants will hear how the initiative acquired a retrofitted airport shuttlebus, which was a part of the Philadelphia Assembled PMA Exhibition in 2018. They will discuss how through the power of partnership and collaboration the Artbus now serves as a mobile creative placemaking tool in communities and agencies throughout the City.





Go out into the surrounding community to learn about current creative placemaking initiatives. These workshops present hands on exploration and application of the takeaways from the Summit.

Research

roundtable

"Setting The Stage for Success"

Setting the Stage for Success - THURSDAY


Explore and discuss better ways to plan for successful creative placemaking and learn from mistakes. Learn from three cases in Philadelphia and Allentown, PA. The featured presentations are as follows: Emma Fried-Cassorla Delaware River Waterfront Corp As waterfront development momentum continues to build and revitalization efforts move forward, DRWC identified new and greater opportunities for art and culture along the waterfront. With that came a need for a more intentional process for incorporating both the art itself and the artistic communities in the development of public spaces. A three-year long process added a “cultural layer” to the Master Plan for the Central Delaware, resulting in a clearly defined vision for locating art outside of traditional venues and expanding cultural experiences. Sean King Cultural Coalition of Allentown Over the past five years, CCA has attempted to introduce the concepts of creative placemaking and the creative economy to the business, government and artistic leaders of the region, sometimes to mixed results. The “Failing Forward Fast” session will take attendees through the highs and lows of educating a community on the elements of the creative economy and how to navigate the pitfalls which inevitably arise when building a sustainable implementation strategy. Session participants will learn tips and techniques from the real world successes and failures they may encounter in building a community-wide creative economy program. Dan Gasiewski City of Philadelphia Explore work in neighborhoods to transform existing city assets into hubs of creativity and culture. Dan will highlight methodology for creating and sustaining community involvement by using existing spaces in new ways, while simultaneously creating economic opportunities for artists to expand their audiences and work with their own communities. He will share the impact of these programs on the spaces, their communities, and the local artists. Participants will learn about a program that leverages existing infrastructure for creative placemaking that may serve as a model in their communities. Sharla Russell City of Philadelphia The public realm comprises the streets, sidewalks, public plazas, parks and other outdoor spaces that are available without charge and require no key to access them. The public realm belongs to everyone. But in Philadelphia, crumbling sidewalks, rapid and disruptive real estate development, and perceptions of safety create barriers for residents, women and children, seniors, and persons with disabilities. How can placemaking be a tool for: improving premier urban elements such as streets and sidewalks that connect and unify public and private places; creating a sense of place and community; and ensuring access to public spaces that are safe, inclusive and inviting?




Growing and Sustaining Creative Placemaking - THURSDAY


Explore and discuss strategies being used in Maine, New Jersey and Pennsylvania to create healthier and more resilient environments for creative placemaking. These include alternative tax structures, programs that build prestige, advancing cultural entrepreneurship, and incorporating art into infrastructure planning. The featured presentations are: - Growing and sustaining creative placemaking: Innovative approaches
- Turn Infrastructure Projects into Creative Placemaking Projects
- Stronger Creatives = Stronger Places Featured Instructors are: Caitlin Cameron City of Portland, Maine Adam Kenney Bridgeway Capital - Craft Business Accelerator




Issues in State Agency Support of Creative Placemaking- FRIDAY


Research shows that most creative placemaking initiatives have local, grass-roots origins. But that landscape is shifting. Policies by state-level agencies can play important roles in advancing local action. This session will demonstrate the work of two state arts agencies in our region—the Maryland State Arts Council and the PA Council on the Arts. In a group conversation with attendees, panelists will specifically address how their agencies work with local entities AND other state agencies, examining successes, challenges, and benefits to placemakers and residents. How to improve working relationships will also be explored. Featured Instructors are: David B. Pankratz (moderator) The Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council Steven Skerritt-Davis Maryland Arts Coucil Sarah Merritt Pennsylvania Arts Council





"Growing and Sustaining Creative Placemaking"

Growing and sustaining creative placemaking: Innovative approaches - THURSDAY


New Jersey is home to a variety of initiatives that have inspired more creative placemaking: Sustainable Jersey Arts Actions offer prestige. Arts Tank is a 'Shark Tank' style competition. The local CDFI, New Jersey Community Capital, offers loans and lines of credit for creative placemaking. The Northern New Jersey Community Foundation has become a major catalyst and funder in the North Jersey suburbs. NCCP and NJEDA are working on an initiative to grow the state's cultural economy. Participants will learn about these initiatives and how organizations can work to create a web of initiatives to support creative placemaking.




Turn Infrastructure Projects into Creative Placemaking Projects - THURSDAY


Caitlin Cameron City of Portland, Maine Local governments have on-going infrastructure projects to accomplish the nuts and bolts of city and transportation functionality. While projects are being designed, approvals sought, and construction crews mobilized, why not incorporate public art and creative placemaking elements? The case profile will focus on three examples in Portland, Maine where infrastructure projects were enhanced, physically and financially, by incorporating creative placemaking.




Stronger Creatives = Stronger Places - THURSDAY


Adam Kenney Bridgeway Capital - Craft Business Accelerator I plan to outline the value of interweaving themes of entrepreneurship into creative placemaking efforts. Creative places are made more energetic and resilient when activated by capable and confident artists, designers, craftspeople, and makers. That empowerment is enhanced when they allocate energy towards developing sustainable businesses, as well as their creative practices. When their business status and financial health are sound, creative entrepreneurs more actively participate in the elements of creative placemaking. Their success also dispels stereotypes of “starving artists” which counters the goal of creative placemaking in presenting the arts as a source of cultural and economic vitality.





"Successful Strategies for More Inclusive Communities"

Building Vibrant Communities from Within - THURSDAY


Leigh Solomon Pugliano, Zaheen Hussain New Sun Rising New Sun Rising will share examples of convening community stakeholders, co-designing programs with communities, and planning for various stages of community interaction.




Re-forging the Cultural Legacy of the Lehigh Valley - THURSDAY


Keiko Tsuruta Cramer WRT Winner of the 2017 Rudy Bruner Award, one of the largest brownfield sites in the country is now showcased as part of a unique cultural and entertainment campus known as the SteelStacks, contributing to the extensive economic resurgence of the Lehigh Valley. With this catalytic project, the city and region continue to transform urban environment through placemaking, and all started from grassroots movement within the community. This session will share insight of creative process, how plcemaking can be a springboard for economic development, and Learn how underutilized cultural artifacts can be re-imagined as public spaces through placemaking design process.




Case Study: Front Line Care Givers Respond - THURSDAY


Helen Kauder Artspace Over the past two years, our annual festival has addressed themes related to healthcare, aging and well-being. This presentation will describe the ways we created a forum for the language, movement, and ideas of care, as practiced by end of life care givers (e.g. ER Room Trauma Nurse, Hospice worker, Cancer Buddy, Death Doula), became inspiration for artists to make dance, music, theater and visual work. We will also look at intergenerational collaborations that engage artists in their 70s, 80s, and 90s and pass memory on.





"Housing and Gentrification Issues in Creative Placemaking"

Intergenerational Homesharing: Community Cohered by Story - FRIDAY


Rachel Wenrick Writers Room, Drexel University In this short presentation, I’ll share how the method of co-creation, core to Writers Room since the program’s inception in 2014, has allowed us to develop the concept for a writers house and intergenerational homesharing network as an anti-displacement strategy, build the extensive cross-discipline, cross-sector partner network needed to implement it, and earn crucial neighborhood and institutional support. The goal is for participants to leave with ideas for how this concept might be adapted in their own communities.




Creative Placekeeping: Art Pop Lancaster, PA - FRIDAY


Salina Mayloni Almanzar Independent Artist (employed at F&M College and Drexel University) I plan to describe the process behind Art Pop as well as the collaboration between individuals, local organizations, the city Public Art Committee, and the city at large. The collaborative approach was crucial to the success, trust-building, and success of the project. I will present a slideshow of the work in the park, describe how each activity or pivot point was created and used to advance the project. Ultimately, I hope to engage the audience in a dialogue as an artist and community member dealing with the tension between the arts, rapid gentrification, and segregation in Lancaster City.





"Tools for Activating Underutilized Spaces"

Using Geolocative Tech to Increase Inclusivity - FRIDAY


Adrienne Mackey Swim Pony Performing Arts TrailOff will be a transmedial walking performance created by my company Swim Pony in collaboration with the Pennsylvania Environmental Council (PEC), premiering June 2020 as a free-to-download mobile app. Central to the project are 10 original audio stories, inspired by paths within the region’s expansive Circuit Trail network. Each trail will feature an original drama that unfolds over a roughly 2 mile route, written by a local author who demonstrates both rigorous artistic practice and connections to communities traditionally underserved by environmental programming. Audiences will experience these intimate journeys through the app, which uses GPS triggering to link audio to physical attributes along the mapped route. Once launched, the app will be maintained and available (always free of charge) for a year. This session looks at how to structure projects that use geolocative opportunities to embed stories and experience into place as well as some best tips at inviting communities into a tech-collaboration. It also explores some of the best practices that will need to be in place to create real room for artist and community empowerment while still meeting the deadlines and needs of the app development process.




A Toolkit for Early-Phase Infrastructure Reuse Projects - FRIDAY


Asima Jansveld Friends of the High Line, Inc. Aware of the potential of community transformation through public space, the High Line Network creates a learning community for infrastructure reuse projects and their leaders. Its Best Practices Toolkit: Strategies and Tactics for Early-Phase Infrastructure Reuse Projects provides a starter “how-to” guide for community leaders to create dynamic spaces while maximizing benefits to local communities. This session will share the toolkit’s lessons on how leaders can incorporate equitable policies from the onset of their planning work. While the session will focus on infrastructure reuse projects led by nonprofit partners in particular, all open space leaders are encouraged to attend.




What happens when you add 50 hammocks? - FRIDAY


Lizzie Woods Delaware River Waterfront Corp DRWC is the steward of Philadelphia’s central Delaware River waterfront. It is also the landholder of many piers, upland green spaces, and plazas. As the organization works to transform the waterfront into a recreational, cultural and commercial district, it does so through the reclamation and reuse of this existing infrastructure. Using hammocks, lights, and art, and of course its location on the river, DRWC has been able to transform an unused sculpture park, a 100 year-old municipal pier, and a high-rise plaza into national destinations.





Summit participants are eager to learn about new thinking and analysis in the creative placemaking field.  We invite you to submit a proposal to present and facilitate a conversation on your book, research-based scholarly article, a report prepared for an institution (such as an arts agency), doctoral dissertation, master's thesis, or capstone for the Certificate in Creative Placemaking program . The presentation should be based on research conducted within the last three years.  It has to be published within the past two years, or be a forthcoming document. You can also submit a proposal to moderate a roundtable conversation on research conducted by others. In this case, please identify the researchers and the research projects they will be discussing. For questions about this type of session, please contact NCCP Founding Director Leonardo Vazquez, AICP/PP at leo@cpcommunities.org

Board Chair: Colleen Finnegan Kahl

Founding Director: Leonardo Vazquez, AICP/PP

28 Valley Road

Montclair, NJ 07042

973.763.6352

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